Almost NLC time again…

Every year at around this time amateur astronomers – including several EAS members – start looking out for displays of “noctilucent clouds”, or “NLC”, in the north after midnight. What are they? There’s a beginners guide on my blog which will tell you when to look for them, and what you’re looking for…

NLC

EAS May Meeting report

Another great meeting at Kendal Museum. Many thanks to Dr Mark Norris, from Alston Observatory and Lancaster University, for giving us a fascinating talk on star clusters and galaxies at our May meeting last night. Mark’s talk was full of amazing facts about some of the most interesting objects astronomers are studying today, and gave us a lot of insight into how science works “behind the scenes” too. Thanks for coming to see us Mark, and thanks to everyone who came along to the meeting too – it’s always great for a guest speaker to arrive and see a room full of people there to hear what they came to talk about.
We were also treated to another hugely enjoyable “Constellation Profile” from Moira. This month she turned her attention towards Bootes, and her enthusiasm for astronomy shone through as ever. Thanks Moira!
 
Last night’s meeting was also the final EAS meeting with Stuart Atkinson as Society Secretary. He is standing down after more than 13 years in the role. A new Secretary will be in place for the June meeting.

EAS MAY MEETING

Hi everyone,

Quick reminder that it’s our May meeting tomorrow night. There’ll be the usual round-up of space and astronomy news (some GORGEOUS images of Saturn this month) and a look at what’s in the sky at the moment, and a report on our recent Society trip to Alston Observatory too. I’m sure someone will have some photos from the MoonWatch to show as well. And we have a very special guest speaker this month, so please come along and support them… (please note: our guest speaker begins his talk at 8pm, the meeting begins at 7pm as usual!)

MOONWATCH – Friday May 5th

The next public observing event being held by the Society is a “MoonWatch”, at the Brewery Arts Centre this coming Friday May 5th, starting at 8pm. Members of the EAS will have telescopes set up in the gardens of the Brewery Arts Centre to show people the Moon. which will be shining close to Jupiter that evening.

The event is free, and members of the public are invited to bring along their own equipment – cameras, binoculars and telescopes – to join in the fun!

EAS TRIP TO ALSTON OBSERVATORY

On Monday night around a dozen members of the Eddington AS travelled down to Alston Observatory, near Preston, for a very enjoyable evening spent listening to a talk on our place in the universe, looking at a lovely old “vintage” telescope and looking through a superb 28″ telescope! Full report at the next meeting, with lots of photos. In the meantime, thanks to everyone who came along, and a special thanks to David Glass for arranging the evening for us!

 

EAS TRIP – April 24th

Everyone,

For those who weren’t at the March meeting – or who were but would like a reminder of the details – here’s some information about our Trip being planned for the evening of April 24th. Many thanks to Richard Rae for organising this. If you’re interested in going, please pass that interest on at the April meeting.

 

EDDINGTON AS MoonWatch This Friday

Cross your fingers for clear skies this coming Friday night (March 3rd) because we are having another of our hugely popular “Moon Watch” nights at the Brewery Arts Centre!

As I write this the weather forecast isn’t very good, but as we all know they can change overnight, or just be plain wrong, so let’s just wait and see what happens. If you can see the Moon at or after 6.30pm on Friday night come down to the Brewery, where we’ll have our telescopes set out in the garden.

And what will you see? Well, the Moon will be just short of First Quarter, which is the very best time to look at it through a telescope (not Full Moon, as everyone seems to think) because that’s when the Moon’s jagged mountains and deep craters stand out from the surface most clearly.

On Friday night we’ll have a spectacular view of some of the Moon’s most famous features – weather permitting!

If you come good and early, before Venus drops behind the trees, we should also be able to show you the “Evening Star” through our telescopes – which is now looking like a beautiful thin crescent through telescopes – and the planets Mars and Uranus too, although they’ll just look like tiny stars.

Unfortunately the Space Station won’t be putting in an appearance during our MoonWatch, it’s not an evening object at the moment, but we should see a few other satellites drifting across the sky while we’re Moon-gazing.

The event is free, begins at 6.30pm, and will end around 9pm.